Finnic Herald
Muita ideoita: Finnic
The Finnish flag has come a long way since the first Finnish proto-flag was introduced in 1848. This picture introduces nine selected flag designs from over the years but in reality there are many more proposals and unofficial flag designs out there that are not featured in this picture.

The Finnish flag has come a long way since the first Finnish proto-flag was introduced in 1848. This picture introduces nine selected flag designs from over the years but in reality there are many more proposals and unofficial flag designs out there that are not featured in this picture.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

Who was Kaleva? Did he really exist? The name Kaleva is all over Finnic folk poetry. The Finnish-Karelian epic Kalevala (literally the Land of Kaleva) and the Estonian epic Kalevipoeg (Son of Kalev) contain the name Kalev(a). In mythology Kaleva much like his sons are considered either giants or kings. The characters from ancient oral folk poetry are mostly considered mythological but they may very well be based on real people.

Who was Kaleva? Did he really exist? The name Kaleva is all over Finnic folk poetry. The Finnish-Karelian epic Kalevala (literally the Land of Kaleva) and the Estonian epic Kalevipoeg (Son of Kalev) contain the name Kalev(a). In mythology Kaleva much like his sons are considered either giants or kings. The characters from ancient oral folk poetry are mostly considered mythological but they may very well be based on real people.

The Finnic - i.e. Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about 7 million people. Most linguistics agree that there are 7 distinct languages in the Finnic language branch: Finnish, Estonian, Karelian, Vepsian, Ingrian, Votian and Livonian.

The Finnic - i.e. Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about 7 million people. Most linguistics agree that there are 7 distinct languages in the Finnic language branch: Finnish, Estonian, Karelian, Vepsian, Ingrian, Votian and Livonian.

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala