Finnic Herald

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Finnic Herald
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The Finnish flag has come a long way since the first Finnish proto-flag was introduced in 1848. This picture introduces nine selected flag designs from over the years but in reality there are many more proposals and unofficial flag designs out there that are not featured in this picture.

The Finnish flag has come a long way since the first Finnish proto-flag was introduced in This picture introduces nine selected flag designs from . The Finnish Flag

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The Suontaka Sword

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The Suontaka Sword

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The Suontaka Sword

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The Suontaka Sword

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The grave dates to approximately 1030 AD but the sword was probably forged earlier in the 10th century. The sword is unique - a matching one has not been found anywhere in the world.

The Suontaka Sword (Finnish: Suontaan miekka) was found in 1968 from a grave along with a body of a woman in Suontaka village of Häme, Finland. The Suontaka Sword

Who was Kaleva? Did he really exist? The name Kaleva is all over Finnic folk poetry. The Finnish-Karelian epic Kalevala (literally the Land of Kaleva) and the Estonian epic Kalevipoeg (Son of Kalev) contain the name Kalev(a). In mythology Kaleva much like his sons are considered either giants or kings. The characters from ancient oral folk poetry are mostly considered mythological but they may very well be based on real people.

Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about

The Finnic - i.e. Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about 7 million people. Most linguistics agree that there are 7 distinct languages in the Finnic language branch: Finnish, Estonian, Karelian, Vepsian, Ingrian, Votian and Livonian.

The Finnic - i. Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

Wooden Chest & The Kalevala

The name Kaleva is all over Finnic folk poetry. The Finnish-Karelian epic Kalevala (literally the Land of Kaleva) a.

The looped square symbol has made an appearance in numerous ancient objects found in Northern Europe. In Finnish it's called Käpälikkö (pawform) or Hannunvaakuna (Saint John's Arms). In Estonian the symbol is known as Aasruut (loopsquare), Nelinurk (quadrangle) or Võlusõlm (magic knot).

The looped square symbol has made an appearance in numerous ancient objects found in Northern Europe. In Finnish it's called Käpälikkö (pawform) or Hannunvaakuna (Saint John's Arms).

Sauna is an ancient Finnic bathhouse that was warmed up by burning wood under a pile of rocks until the rocks and the sauna interiors were warm enough so people could comfortably remove their clothes inside. Originally saunas didn’t have chimneys. Saunas were preheated prior to use and the smoke was let out before entering. Nowadays a traditional sauna like this is called savusauna or smoke sauna.

Sauna is an ancient Finnic bathhouse that was warmed up by burning wood under a pile of rocks until the rocks and the sauna interiors were warm enough s.

The Finnic - i.e. Baltic Finnic - languages are a branch of the Uralic language family. Linguistically the Finnic languages are divided into 7 individual languages which are Finnish, Estonian, Karelian, Vepsian, Ingrian, Votian and Livonian. Kven, Meänkieli, Võro and Seto are linguistically considered dialects of Finnish and Estonian. These dialects are presented here because of their special status.

The Finnic - i. Baltic Finnic - languages are a branch of the Uralic language family. Linguistically the Finnic languages are divided into 7 individua. Finnic Languages and Dialects with Special Status

The Maiden of Finland - Suomi-neito - is the national personification of Finland. She has been usually pictured as a young beautiful woman with blonde hair and blue eyes - wearing some form of Finnish national dress or a blue and white dress - or sometimes a dress with red and yellow heraldic colors which are present in the coat of arms of Finland.

The Finnic - i. Baltic Finnic - languages (In Finnish: Itämerensuomalaiset kielet - In Estonian: Läänemeresoome keeled) are a branch of the Uralic language family spoken by about

This map exhibits where and what Finnic (Baltic Finnic) languages are spoken according to most recent sources from around 2000-2015. All of the numbers are vague and rounded since many sources differ from each other and broadly statistical imperfection is more than probable. This map and the data enclosed is only aimed to be directional. Also take into account that the numbers have nothing to do with ethnicity - only language.

This map exhibits where and what Finnic (Baltic Finnic) languages are spoken according to most recent sources from around All of the numbers . Map of the Finnic Languages