16th century

43 Pin-lisäykset684 Seuraajat
Elizabeth I receiving two Dutch ambassadors, 1585. This painting was made shortly before the earl of Leicester's expedition to the Low Countries.

Elizabeth I receiving two Dutch ambassadors, 1585. This painting was made shortly before the earl of Leicester's expedition to the Low Countries.

Medieval Hat Circa 1510

Medieval Hat Circa 1510

Elizabeth I: The Peace Portrait, 1580-5, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. In this portrait, the queen is the harbinger of peace. She holds an olive branch in her left hand and a sheathed sword lies at her feet. She is possibly wearing the same headdress, collar and girdle from the 'Ermine Portrait'. Also, both gowns are 'Polish style' with froggings.

Elizabeth I: The Peace Portrait, 1580-5, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. In this portrait, the queen is the harbinger of peace. She holds an olive branch in her left hand and a sheathed sword lies at her feet. She is possibly wearing the same headdress, collar and girdle from the 'Ermine Portrait'. Also, both gowns are 'Polish style' with froggings.

Portrait de Johanna Van Grudingen  Auteur :  Van Scorel Jan (1495-1562)  Crédit photographique :  (C) RMN / Philipp Bernard  Période :  16e siècle, Renaissance (période)  Technique/Matière :  huile sur toile  Localisation :  Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

Portrait de Johanna Van Grudingen Auteur : Van Scorel Jan (1495-1562) Crédit photographique : (C) RMN / Philipp Bernard Période : 16e siècle, Renaissance (période) Technique/Matière : huile sur toile Localisation : Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

Elizabeth I: The Rainbow Portrait, c1600, by Isaac Oliver. This portrait can be viewed at Hatfield House. Oliver was a pupil of Elizabeth's favorite court painter, Nicholas Hilliard, and the brother-in-law of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. Some historians have argued that Gheeraerts painted this portrait, but most favor Oliver.    Elizabeth's gown is embroidered with English wildflowers, thus allowing the queen to pose in the guise of Astraea, the virginal heroine of classical literature…

Elizabeth I: The Rainbow Portrait, c1600, by Isaac Oliver. This portrait can be viewed at Hatfield House. Oliver was a pupil of Elizabeth's favorite court painter, Nicholas Hilliard, and the brother-in-law of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. Some historians have argued that Gheeraerts painted this portrait, but most favor Oliver. Elizabeth's gown is embroidered with English wildflowers, thus allowing the queen to pose in the guise of Astraea, the virginal heroine of classical literature…

The "Hampden" portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the "Virgin Queen".

The "Hampden" portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the "Virgin Queen".

Elizabeth I: The Coronation Portrait, c1600, unknown artist; copy of a lost original. This portrait can be viewed at the NPG. This is a copy of the portrait made to commemorate Elizabeth's accession in 1558. It is a stunning and beautiful image. Elizabeth is lavishly dressed and holds the traditional orb and scepter. Her hair is loose, as befits her unmarried state, and its color is particularly striking against the white of her skin. And, once again, Elizabeth's much-admired hands are…

Elizabeth I: The Coronation Portrait, c1600, unknown artist; copy of a lost original. This portrait can be viewed at the NPG. This is a copy of the portrait made to commemorate Elizabeth's accession in 1558. It is a stunning and beautiful image. Elizabeth is lavishly dressed and holds the traditional orb and scepter. Her hair is loose, as befits her unmarried state, and its color is particularly striking against the white of her skin. And, once again, Elizabeth's much-admired hands are…

Elizabeth I: The Ditchley Portrait, c1592, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. This is the largest surviving full-length portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, despite having 7.5 cm cut from each side. It is also one of the earliest works by Gheeraerts. His name may seem familiar; his father, Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder, painted the 'Peace Portrait' above. This famous work can be viewed at the NPG. There are numerous copies as well; in most, the queen's features are considerably softened.

Elizabeth I: The Ditchley Portrait, c1592, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. This is the largest surviving full-length portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, despite having 7.5 cm cut from each side. It is also one of the earliest works by Gheeraerts. His name may seem familiar; his father, Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder, painted the 'Peace Portrait' above. This famous work can be viewed at the NPG. There are numerous copies as well; in most, the queen's features are considerably softened.

Elizabeth I: The Sieve Portrait, c1583, by Quentin Metsys the Younger. Elizabeth is portrayed with a sieve in a number of portraits. This one is referred to as either the 'Sieve Portrait' or 'The Siena Portrait', to distinguish it from the others. It is one of the few surviving works of Quentin Metsys the Younger and was discovered in 1895, rolled up in the attic of the Palazza Reale in Siena, hence the alternate name. Elizabeth obviously admired this artist's work. In 1577, she…

Elizabeth I: The Sieve Portrait, c1583, by Quentin Metsys the Younger. Elizabeth is portrayed with a sieve in a number of portraits. This one is referred to as either the 'Sieve Portrait' or 'The Siena Portrait', to distinguish it from the others. It is one of the few surviving works of Quentin Metsys the Younger and was discovered in 1895, rolled up in the attic of the Palazza Reale in Siena, hence the alternate name. Elizabeth obviously admired this artist's work. In 1577, she…

Elizabeth I: The Hardwick Portrait, c1599, by Nicholas Hilliard and his workshop. I think this portrait can be viewed at Hardwick Hall, which is maintained by the National Trust. It was comissioned by the legendary Bess of Hardwick, who also embroidered the queen's skirt. The skirt is amazing - sea serpents, dragons, etc

Elizabeth I: The Hardwick Portrait, c1599, by Nicholas Hilliard and his workshop. I think this portrait can be viewed at Hardwick Hall, which is maintained by the National Trust. It was comissioned by the legendary Bess of Hardwick, who also embroidered the queen's skirt. The skirt is amazing - sea serpents, dragons, etc

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