16th century

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Renaissance robe of Dorothea von Neuburg (1598), Old Art Gallery, Munich

Renaissance robe of Dorothea von Neuburg (1598), Old Art Gallery, Munich

Portrait of Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont by François Clouet, ca 1570 France, MFA Houston

Portrait of Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont by François Clouet, ca 1570 France, MFA Houston

Elizabeth I: The Hardwick Portrait, c1599, by Nicholas Hilliard and his workshop. I think this portrait can be viewed at Hardwick Hall, which is maintained by the National Trust. It was comissioned by the legendary Bess of Hardwick, who also embroidered the queen's skirt. The skirt is amazing - sea serpents, dragons, etc

Elizabeth I: The Hardwick Portrait, c1599, by Nicholas Hilliard and his workshop. I think this portrait can be viewed at Hardwick Hall, which is maintained by the National Trust. It was comissioned by the legendary Bess of Hardwick, who also embroidered the queen's skirt. The skirt is amazing - sea serpents, dragons, etc

Bernardino Licinio (1489-1565) Portrait of a Lady

Bernardino Licinio (1489-1565) Portrait of a Lady

Tiziano, Empress Isabel of Portugal, 1548

Tiziano, Empress Isabel of Portugal, 1548

Elizabeth I receiving two Dutch ambassadors, 1585. This painting was made shortly before the earl of Leicester's expedition to the Low Countries.

Elizabeth I receiving two Dutch ambassadors, 1585. This painting was made shortly before the earl of Leicester's expedition to the Low Countries.

The "Hampden" portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the "Virgin Queen".

The "Hampden" portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the "Virgin Queen".

Elizabeth I: The Ermine Portrait, 1585, by Nicholas Hilliard. This portrait can be viewed at Hatfield House. Why is Elizabeth seated with an ermine? It was the symbol of royalty; and, if you look closely at the animal, you can see the gold crown it wears. The crown symbolizes majesty and purity. As for the bejeweled black gown and background - black and white were the queen's favorite colors. Also, the deep, dark color reinforces the symbolic gravity of the painting.    In this portrait…

Elizabeth I: The Ermine Portrait, 1585, by Nicholas Hilliard. This portrait can be viewed at Hatfield House. Why is Elizabeth seated with an ermine? It was the symbol of royalty; and, if you look closely at the animal, you can see the gold crown it wears. The crown symbolizes majesty and purity. As for the bejeweled black gown and background - black and white were the queen's favorite colors. Also, the deep, dark color reinforces the symbolic gravity of the painting. In this portrait…

Elizabeth I: The Peace Portrait, 1580-5, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. In this portrait, the queen is the harbinger of peace. She holds an olive branch in her left hand and a sheathed sword lies at her feet. She is possibly wearing the same headdress, collar and girdle from the 'Ermine Portrait'. Also, both gowns are 'Polish style' with froggings.

Elizabeth I: The Peace Portrait, 1580-5, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder. In this portrait, the queen is the harbinger of peace. She holds an olive branch in her left hand and a sheathed sword lies at her feet. She is possibly wearing the same headdress, collar and girdle from the 'Ermine Portrait'. Also, both gowns are 'Polish style' with froggings.

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