18th century: Striped

57 Pin-lisäykset675 Seuraajat
Madame la comtesse de Forbach, duchesse de Deux-ponts, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806).

Madame la comtesse de Forbach, duchesse de Deux-ponts, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806).

Madame la princesse de Bouillon, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806)

Madame la princesse de Bouillon, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806)

Madame d'Alençon, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806)

Madame d'Alençon, Carrogis Louis Carmontelle (1717-1806)

Portrait of a Woman Drawing  Artist/maker unknown, French?

Portrait of a Woman Drawing Artist/maker unknown, French?

toegeschreven aan Nicolaas Verkolje, Portret van een echtpaar met twee kinderen in een interieur met doorkijk naar een formele tuin.

toegeschreven aan Nicolaas Verkolje, Portret van een echtpaar met twee kinderen in een interieur met doorkijk naar een formele tuin.

Dress (robe à l’anglaise), 1780-1785, striped silk taffeta. © Jean Tholance, Les arts Décoratifs, Paris, collection UFAC. All rights reserved.

Dress (robe à l’anglaise), 1780-1785, striped silk taffeta. © Jean Tholance, Les arts Décoratifs, Paris, collection UFAC. All rights reserved.

18th century dress

18th century dress

Robe à la polonaise, English, 1775-1780.  Robe and Polonaise of lustring striped in pale green, cream and two shades of purple, with boning and lined with linen.

Robe à la polonaise, English, 1775-1780. Robe and Polonaise of lustring striped in pale green, cream and two shades of purple, with boning and lined with linen.

A style introduced in the 1770s called a polonaise. Using buttons and loops, the skirt of the gown was draped up to create the swathed effect at the back shown here. Also popular during this decade were a range of striped fabrics, often in a complex arrangement of colours with both sharp and shaded edges, as seen in this example. Draping the skirt was not only a fashionable option. It also served as a practical method of raising the skirt above the dirt and dust on the ground.

A style introduced in the 1770s called a polonaise. Using buttons and loops, the skirt of the gown was draped up to create the swathed effect at the back shown here. Also popular during this decade were a range of striped fabrics, often in a complex arrangement of colours with both sharp and shaded edges, as seen in this example. Draping the skirt was not only a fashionable option. It also served as a practical method of raising the skirt above the dirt and dust on the ground.

Presumed to be Yvonette Moulin de la Racinire, mid 18th C by Francois-Hubert Drouais

Presumed to be Yvonette Moulin de la Racinire, mid 18th C by Francois-Hubert Drouais

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