Daniel Sjöblom

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Daniel Sjöblom
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Medusa was originally a ravishingly beautiful maiden, "the jealous aspiration of many suitors," but because Poseidon had raped her in Athena's temple, the enraged Athena transformed Medusa's beautiful hair to serpents and made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn onlookers to stone. In Ovid's telling, Perseus describes Medusa's punishment by Minerva (Athena) as just and well earned.

Medusa was originally a ravishingly beautiful maiden, "the jealous aspiration of many suitors," but because Poseidon had raped her in Athena's temple, the enraged Athena transformed Medusa's beautiful hair to serpents and made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn onlookers to stone. In Ovid's telling, Perseus describes Medusa's punishment by Minerva (Athena) as just and well earned.

Emily Cheung, artistic director of Toronto's Little Pear Garden Collective, has transformed the legend of the White Snake into a contemporary dance work called Venom of Love, on at the Fleck Dance Theatre May 15 to 17.

Emily Cheung, artistic director of Toronto's Little Pear Garden Collective, has transformed the legend of the White Snake into a contemporary dance work called Venom of Love, on at the Fleck Dance Theatre May 15 to 17.

Lithuanian Egle – Queen of the Grass Snakes Posted by ELDER MOUNTAIN DREAMING A Lithuanian Folktale – Egle means “Spruce” and at one time the Slavs and Balts had the Cult of the Evergreen… – Once upon a time there lived an older couple who had twelve sons and three daughters, the youngest of whom was called Egle. One summer evening the sisters went for a swim and they swam and splashed about, and, having had their fill of it, climbed out on shore and reached for their clothes.

Lithuanian Egle – Queen of the Grass Snakes Posted by ELDER MOUNTAIN DREAMING A Lithuanian Folktale – Egle means “Spruce” and at one time the Slavs and Balts had the Cult of the Evergreen… – Once upon a time there lived an older couple who had twelve sons and three daughters, the youngest of whom was called Egle. One summer evening the sisters went for a swim and they swam and splashed about, and, having had their fill of it, climbed out on shore and reached for their clothes.