The Lord Howe Island stick insect is a species of stick insect which lives on the Lord Howe Island Group. It was thought to be extinct by 1930, only to be rediscovered in 2001. It was extinct in its largest habitat, Lord Howe Island, and has been called "the rarest insect in the world", as the rediscovered population consisted of 24 individuals living on the small islet of Ball's Pyramid.

Class: Insecta Order: Phasmatodea Family: Phasmatidae Genus: Dryococelus Species: australis Common Name: Lord Howe Island Stick Insect

Lord Howe Island Stick Insect, also called a "tree lobster" : Howe Island walking sticks seem to pair off — an unusual insect behavior — and Jane Goodall remarked of "how they sleep at night, in pairs, the male with three of his legs protectively over the female beside him."

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years - Image: Male Lord Howe Island Stick Insect K - by Matthew Bulbert

This is not real, photo shopped or glued together pieces

Lord Howe stick insect (Dryococelus Australis) The biggest insect in the world and one of the rarest.

Nacimiento de insectos palo (Dryococelus australis) - YouTube

Nacimiento de insectos palo (Dryococelus australis) - YouTube

Nymph, Dryococelus australis was thought to be extinct, following the accidental introduction of rats to Lord Howe Island in 1918, but has since been discovered on a small volcanic outcrop called Ball’s Pyramid.

Nymph, Dryococelus australis was thought to be extinct, following the accidental introduction of rats to Lord Howe Island in 1918, but has since been discovered on a small volcanic outcrop called Ball’s Pyramid.

The Tree Lobster | Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster.

Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster.

A tiny island sits almost four hundred miles from the Eastern coast of Australia. Upon that island once lived a large population of giant stick insects—six inch-long “land lobsters” dwelling in trees—the Dryococelus australis. But a hundred years ago, mankind came along, bringing pests, black rats, with them. The bugs went extinct at the hands of the rats.

This Horrible Stick Bug Is No Longer Extinct, Sorry

Dryococelus australis, Lord Howe stick insect (nhm, 2013)

The oldest and most important entomology collection in the world of over 34 million insects and arachnids.

Land Lobsters (Dryococelus australis). Gigantic stick insects. Found on Ball's Pyramid, Australia

7 Extreme Bugs and Creepy-Crawlies

Tree lobster thought extinct for 80 years found alive on tiny island

Dryococelus australis

A critically endangered Lord Howe Island stick insect (Dryococelus australis) at the Melbourne Zoo.

Dryococelus australis: the stick lobster insect comes out of extinction

The world’s heaviest flightless insect, the size of a human hand, has been rediscovered on a remote rock after scientists thought it had become extinct. And now the Lord Howe Island stick ins…

Mögliche Bewegungsstudie Schlüpfen aus dem Ei Lord Howe Island stick insect video - Dryococelus australis -

Lord Howe Island stick insect hatching - View incredible Lord Howe Island stick insect videos - Dryococelus australis - on Arkive

They were Dryococelus australis. A search the next morning, and two years later, concluded these are the only ones on Ball's Pyramid, the last ones. They live there, and, as best we know, nowhere else.

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

The Lord Howe Island stick insect, Dryococelus australis, once believed to be extinct, was found living under a small shrub high up Ball's Pyramid in

Lord Howe Island stick insect - the rarest insect in the world, found in Australia

The Lord Howe Island stick insect (Dryococelus australis), aka the ‘land lobster’, is critically endangered.

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