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To commemorate the fifth anniversary of the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) launch, NASA released a five-year timelapse of the sun - The SDO is a mission designed to study where the sun's energy comes from, and also help us understand its influence on Earth. The footage, above, captured one frame every eight hours, from June 2010 to Feb. 8, 2015. Eric Larson & Chris Grasinger-

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From year to year, the moon never seems to change. Craters and other formations appear to be permanent now, but the moon didn't always look like this. Thanks...

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Black Marble - Americas NASA image acquired April 18 - October 23, 2012 This image of North and South America at night is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. The new data was mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.

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Space Telescope or Transformer?The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope. The project is working to a 2018 launch date By NASA Goddard Photo and Video

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A Strange Thing Happened in Earth's Stratosphere | NASA Goddard | Sept. 2, 2016: High above Earth’s tropics, a pattern of winds changed recently in a way that scientists had never seen in more than 60 years of consistent measurements. This disruption to the wind pattern—called the “quasi-biennial oscillation"—did not have any immediate impact on weather or climate as we experience it on Earth’s surface. But it does raise interesting questions! If a pattern holds for six decades & hen…

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palvelusta Gabetumblr

Tour of the Moon [NASA] Although the moon has

Tour of the Moon [NASA] / #science!

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palvelusta Laughing Squid

High Resolution Image of Earth by NASA’s New Suomi NPP Satellite

High Resolution Image of Earth by NASA’s New Suomi NPP Satellite

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Magnificent CME Erupts on the Sun - August 31 On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space at 4:36 p.m. EDT. The coronal mass ejection, or CME, traveled at over 900 miles per second. The CME did not travel directly toward Earth, but did connect with Earth's magnetic environment, or magnetosphere, causing aurora to appear on the night of Monday, September 3. Photo credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO

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