Jaakko Malmgren
Muita ideoita: Jaakko
And there's so much more out there, out of sight, out of reach. And this is just ONE galaxy! Imagine how many, countless, more there are! Such an endless universe! So many possibilities! So many worlds and dreams...

And there's so much more out there, out of sight, out of reach. And this is just ONE galaxy! Imagine how many, countless, more there are! Such an endless universe! So many possibilities! So many worlds and dreams...

NGC 3521 - Galaxy in a Bubble

NGC 3521 - Galaxy in a Bubble

Galaxy M81

Galaxy M81

The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way and is one only ten galaxies that can be seen unaided from the Earth...

The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way and is one only ten galaxies that can be seen unaided from the Earth...

Orion Nebula in Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Sulfur Image Credit Copyright: César Blanco González The Orion Nebula is among the most intensely studied celestial features.The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula.

Orion Nebula in Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Sulfur Image Credit Copyright: César Blanco González The Orion Nebula is among the most intensely studied celestial features.The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula.

Comparativa de tamaños

Comparativa de tamaños

Comparativa de tamaños

Comparativa de tamaños

Images taken of land masses (Earth at Night) by . . . . geostationary satellites using long term exposure

Images taken of land masses (Earth at Night) by . . . . geostationary satellites using long term exposure