Hurlingham Racquet Centre – light green roof features wood elements

The Hurlingham project in London involved the construction of a sports complex including four indoor tennis courts and four squash courts. The racquet hall, designed by David Morley Architects, is 35 metres wide and 55 metres long. The main span consists of suspended steel beams. To give the courts space and reduce the costs, the beams are spaced with large gaps of 12.9 metres. To fill these gaps, the architect wanted to see wood.
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The hall is 35m wide and 55m long. The main span consists of suspended steel beams. To give the courts space and reduce the cost of these complex beams, they are placed with large gaps of 12.9 meters. Images by Metsä Wood / The Hurligham Club, London

The hall is 35m wide and 55m long. The main span consists of suspended steel beams. To give the courts space and reduce the cost of these complex beams, they are placed with large gaps of 12.9 meters. Images by Metsä Wood / The Hurligham Club, London

The Hurlingham Racquet Centre is a sports complex including four indoor tennis courts and four squash courts. Image by The Hurlingham Club, London

The Hurlingham Racquet Centre is a sports complex including four indoor tennis courts and four squash courts. Image by The Hurlingham Club, London

The Hurlingham Club is a green oasis of tradition, renowned throughout the world as one of the largest private clubs. The Racquet Centre, designed by David Morley Architects, has a sunken, low-profile shape and a curved green sedum roof to minimise the environmental impact of the building. Image by The Hurlingham Club, London

The Hurlingham Club is a green oasis of tradition, renowned throughout the world as one of the largest private clubs. The Racquet Centre, designed by David Morley Architects, has a sunken, low-profile shape and a curved green sedum roof to minimise the environmental impact of the building. Image by The Hurlingham Club, London

he roof elements fit flush with the vaulted, spaced, bowstring steel truss. To get the steel element the same depth as the Kerto LVL elements (645 millimeters), the steel manufacturer was heavily involved. Image by Metsä Wood UK

he roof elements fit flush with the vaulted, spaced, bowstring steel truss. To get the steel element the same depth as the Kerto LVL elements (645 millimeters), the steel manufacturer was heavily involved. Image by Metsä Wood UK

​​​Racquet Centre roof with wood elements

​​​Racquet Centre roof with wood elements

The bottom plate of the roof elements used in the project were made of a special Kerto-Q LVL called SONANS acoustics panels (perforation dia 10 @ 20 millimeters), with 50 millimeters of acoustic insulation internally within the panel allowing a high absorption coefficient required in the tennis hall  (sound absorption coefficient: αw = 0.75-  class C). Image by Metsä Wood

The bottom plate of the roof elements used in the project were made of a special Kerto-Q LVL called SONANS acoustics panels (perforation dia 10 @ 20 millimeters), with 50 millimeters of acoustic insulation internally within the panel allowing a high absorption coefficient required in the tennis hall (sound absorption coefficient: αw = 0.75- class C). Image by Metsä Wood

The Kerto wood elements constitute the vaulted roof construction are 12.9 meters long and have a total height of 645mm and maximum width of 1200 millimeters. To accommodate the curve of the structure four different widths were determined 550 mm, 600 mm 700 mm, and 1200 mm, totaling 140 prefabricated wood elements. Image by Metsä Wood UK

The Kerto wood elements constitute the vaulted roof construction are 12.9 meters long and have a total height of 645mm and maximum width of 1200 millimeters. To accommodate the curve of the structure four different widths were determined 550 mm, 600 mm 700 mm, and 1200 mm, totaling 140 prefabricated wood elements. Image by Metsä Wood UK

The connection detail between the Kerto elements and the steel element had to therefore be carefully designed. The project team of architects, designers and constructor detailed the roof connections using BIM modeling.  Image by Metsä Wood UK

The connection detail between the Kerto elements and the steel element had to therefore be carefully designed. The project team of architects, designers and constructor detailed the roof connections using BIM modeling. Image by Metsä Wood UK

The curved light-weight roof supports a heavy green roof. Image by Hurlingham Club, London

The curved light-weight roof supports a heavy green roof. Image by Hurlingham Club, London

With the arch in the roof, the supports and the installation process had to be considered at design stage in order not to have avoid difficulties any problems during while the erection of the roof. Image by Metsä Wood UK

With the arch in the roof, the supports and the installation process had to be considered at design stage in order not to have avoid difficulties any problems during while the erection of the roof. Image by Metsä Wood UK

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