In Kalevala, the Finnish national epic, Ilmatar was a virgin Personification of Air. Her Father was Sky, Her Mother was Primal Waters. Her name literally means "female air spirit." In Kalevala, Ilmatar is portrayed as androgynous with both male and female aspects, though she is primarily female. She was impregnated by the sea and wind and thus became the mother of Väinämöinen, the Finnish Creator of Life.

Ilmatar, was a virgin Personification of Air. Her Father was Sky, her Mother was Primal Waters. Her name literally means "female air spirit." She became the mother of Väinämöinen, the Finnish Creator of Life.

Iku-Turso - A malevolent sea monster in Finnish mythology, mentioned in the Finnish national epic Kalevala

Iku-Turso - A malevolent sea monster in Finnish mythology, mentioned in the Finnish national epic Kalevala - my namesake!

Tapio is an East Finnish forest spirit or god, who figured prominently in the Kalevala. Hunters prayed to him before a hunt.  His wife is the goddess of the forest, Mielikki. He was the father of Annikki, Tellervo, Nyyrikki (the god of hunting), and Tuulikki.  Fitting the Green Man archetype, Tapio has a beard of lichen and eyebrows of moss.

The Lesovik (Leshy) or is a male woodland spirit in Slavic mythology who protects wild animals and forests. He is roughly analogous to the Woodwose of Western Europe and the Basajaun of the Basque Country.

In the Finnish mythology  the Nine diseases are the sons of Loviatar, the blind daughter of Tuoni.She is impregnated by the wind. According to the version told in the Kalevala they are Pistos (consumption), Ähky (colic), Luuvalo (gout), Riisi (rickets), Paise (ulcer), Rupi (scab), Syöjä (cancer), and Rutto (plague). The ninth, a witch and the worst of all, remains unnamed. He, the personification of envy, is banished by his mother to become the scourge of mankind.

nowheresafefromthestorm: “ In the Finnish mythology the Nine diseases are the sons of Loviatar,the blind daughter of Tuoni.She is impregnated by wind.According to the version told in the Kalevala.

Lemminkainen, the Hero of the Kalevala, the national epic of Finland.

Lemminkainen, Finnish Hero of the Kalevala--Finland pagan finnish gods and goddesses pagan gods and goddesses pagan finland kalevala pagan m.

Hannunvaakuna - Kalevala Koru

Hannunvaakuna - Kalevala Koru Kalevala is the folk epic of Finland. Finnish was one of the biggest influences on Tolkien's Elvish. The stories are gorgeous, full of action but not as bloodthirsty as their Norse cousins.

SINGING THE KALEVALA  These two Finns are singing the Kalevala, the national epic of Finland. While singing they swing their bodies backward and forward. Often the singers sit facing each other astride the same bench instead of on opposite benches. It is customary to sing many poetical folk tales in this fashion.

Singing the Kalevala: often done in pairs, holding hands, an ancient tradition.Finnish rune singers sat face to face and held each other's hands.They also moved their bodies sync with the song.

Insanely detailed paintings of kaiju fighting in historical battles will fill you with awe

Insanely detailed paintings of kaiju fighting in historical battles will fill you with awe

Iku-Turso is a sea-monster in the Finnish mythology collected in the poetry of Kalevala. Illustration by Miina Sundberg.

In Finnish folklore, Ajatar is a spirit known as "Devil of the Woods". It is an evil female spirit that manifests as a snake or dragon. Ajatar is said to be the mother of the devil. She spreads disease and pestilence, any that look at her become ill, and she suckles serpents. She is in some ways similar to Babylonian Tiamat, dragon mother of the gods and goddesses. The word "ajatar" is possibly derived from the verb ajaa, "chase".

After making a Fae or Fairy Pact, this human is Changing. - Digital Art by Benita Winckler

Iku Turso, illustration from the Kalevala Illustration by Miina Sundberg

Iku-Turso is a sea-monster in the Finnish mythology collected in the poetry of Kalevala. Illustration by Miina Sundberg.

Akseli Gallen-Kallela, 'Aino' triptych (right-hand panel) Aino has decided to take her own life rather than marry the ancient Väinamöinen. She sits on the shore and listens to the song of the water-maidens of Vellamo.

The Aino myth painting, aAkseli Gallen-Kallela paintings reproduction, we never sell The Aino myth poster

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