Muita ideoita: Hill
Tuonela is the underworld, the realm of the dead, in Finnish mythology. Like other underworlds from mythology, it sits on an island and is reached by crossing a river. It is ruled over by the god Tuoni, and his wife Tuonetar, who serves as ferrywoman and hostess.     This realm appears in the Kalevala when Väinämöinen travels there seeking knowledge.

Tuonela is the underworld, the realm of the dead, in Finnish mythology. Like other underworlds from mythology, it sits on an island and is reached by crossing a river. It is ruled over by the god Tuoni, and his wife Tuonetar, who serves as ferrywoman and hostess. This realm appears in the Kalevala when Väinämöinen travels there seeking knowledge.

Vellamo - Finnish folklore as the goddess of the sea

Vellamo - Finnish folklore as the goddess of the sea

In Finnish myth, there is an magical jewel called Ravenstone, what raven keeps under its tongue or in its nest.  Raven can absorb magical powers from the jewelstone, and with jewels powers it could turn itself or any object invisible. Ravens killer could sometimes gain stones powers to him/herself.

In Finnish myth, there is an magical jewel called Ravenstone, what raven keeps under its tongue or in its nest. Raven can absorb magical powers from the jewelstone, and with jewels powers it could turn itself or any object invisible. Ravens killer could sometimes gain stones powers to him/herself.

A Phooka is a very dangerous and often violent shapeshifting trickster from Celtic myth, known for their ability to change into great fearsome black animals so that they can scare humans.    Some Phookas take a liking to humans and just play harmless pranks (like Harvey the rabbit of Jimmy Stewart movie fame) other Phookas are blood-thirsty vampire-like creatures which lure humans to their doom.

A Phooka is a very dangerous and often violent shapeshifting trickster from Celtic myth, known for their ability to change into great fearsome black animals so that they can scare humans. Some Phookas take a liking to humans and just play harmless pranks (like Harvey the rabbit of Jimmy Stewart movie fame) other Phookas are blood-thirsty vampire-like creatures which lure humans to their doom.

Phooka, Brian Froud & Alan Lee - The Púca (Irish for goblin) is a creature of Celtic folklore, notably in Ireland, the West of Scotland, and Wales. It is one of the myriad fairy folk, and, like many fairy folk, is both respected and feared by those who believe in it.

Phooka, Brian Froud & Alan Lee - The Púca (Irish for goblin) is a creature of Celtic folklore, notably in Ireland, the West of Scotland, and Wales. It is one of the myriad fairy folk, and, like many fairy folk, is both respected and feared by those who believe in it.

Krampus is a beast-like creature from the folklore of Alpine countries thought to punish children during the Yule season who had misbehaved, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards well-behaved ones with gifts. Krampus kidnaps naughty children in his sack and takes them back to his lair.

Krampus is a beast-like creature from the folklore of Alpine countries thought to punish children during the Yule season who had misbehaved, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards well-behaved ones with gifts. Krampus kidnaps naughty children in his sack and takes them back to his lair.

A troll is a supernatural being in Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore. In origin, troll may have been a negative synonym for a jötunn (plural jötnar), a being in Norse mythology. In Old Norse sources, beings described as trolls dwell in isolated rocks, mountains, or caves, live together in small family units, and are rarely helpful to human beings.

A troll is a supernatural being in Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore. In origin, troll may have been a negative synonym for a jötunn (plural jötnar), a being in Norse mythology. In Old Norse sources, beings described as trolls dwell in isolated rocks, mountains, or caves, live together in small family units, and are rarely helpful to human beings.

Nordic, particularly Icelandic, folklore tells of mermen known as Marbendlar, and tales of mermaids and mermen were often found in the folklore and legends of the British Isles. Mermaids were noted in British folklore as ominous: foretelling disaster as well as provoking it. Some were described as monstrous in size, up to 160 feet. Mermaids could also swim up rivers to freshwater lakes.

Nordic, particularly Icelandic, folklore tells of mermen known as Marbendlar, and tales of mermaids and mermen were often found in the folklore and legends of the British Isles. Mermaids were noted in British folklore as ominous: foretelling disaster as well as provoking it. Some were described as monstrous in size, up to 160 feet. Mermaids could also swim up rivers to freshwater lakes.

Sword chart

Sword chart

Medieval city planning: organized around church and market at center; rings of surrounding streets; city wall at perimeter

Medieval city planning: organized around church and market at center; rings of surrounding streets; city wall at perimeter