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Knight on horseback - Description: - Parchment - 220 x 152 mm Country: Austria . Region: Vienna. Assigned Date: s. XIV/XV Searchable Date Range: 1390 - 1410.

Searchable Date Range: 1390 - Dated by scribe: Latin. Cambridge, Harvard University, Houghton Library, MS Typ Medieval Imago & Dies Vitae Idade Media e Cotidiano.

Herr Reinmar von Zweter, a 13th-century Minnesinger, was depicted with his noble arms in Codex Manesse.

Herr Reinmar von Zweter, a Minnesinger, was depicted with his noble arms in Codex Manesse.

"A glass of this type [free-blown colorless glass with applied decoration] appears to be represented in the famous Codex Manesse, an extensive compendium of late medieval ballads and epigrammatic poetry that was compiled between 1300 and 1340 in Zürich." From The Cloisters' In Season blog; click through to read more.

Curator Tim Husband discusses three recently acquired late medieval glass vessels in The Cloisters Collection.

Bany, codice Manesse,1300

Bathtime The bulk of the Manesse Codex paintings were produced between 1300 and Twenty-seven of the miniatures were painted around 1330 by supplementary artists.

Geoffrey Chaucer known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, alchemist and astronomer. Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat.

Written in Middle English, Canterbury Tales popularized using the English language for artistic or academic purposes. At the time, English was the vernacular in Britain, but Latin and French were esteemed as a higher class of language.

"And God said unto him, "While you're out, please grab some bread, milk, a dozen eggs, maybe a frozen pizza or two..."  Manuscript:	Harley 3244 - Theological miscellany  Folio:	28  Location:	England  Dating:	1236 - 1275  Institution:	British Library  Image Source:	http://molcat1.bl.uk/IllImages/Ekta/big/E117/E117980b.jpg

Manuscript: Harley 3244 - Theological miscellany Folio: 28 Location: England Dating: 1236 - 1275 Institution: British Library Image

This is a 14th century German treatise on swordsmanship, and yes, that is a woman on the left in both pictures, and a monk on the right. There is a lot of debate as to the proper interpretation of this treatise, but I think the main takeaway is that maybe the lives of medieval women (and monks) were not as dull as we sometimes assume.

A page from a Medieval swordplay manual. Why am I posting this? Because there were systematic training systems - martial arts - in every culture.

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