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Cyttaria

Cyttaria

Wild spongs. Spongs of the woods.

Wild spongs. Spongs of the woods.

Phallus indusiatus, commonly called the bamboo fungus, bamboo pith, long net stinkhorn, crinoline stinkhornor veiled lady, is a fungus in the family Phallaceae, or stinkhorns.

Phallus indusiatus, commonly called the bamboo fungus, bamboo pith, long net stinkhorn, crinoline stinkhornor veiled lady, is a fungus in the family Phallaceae, or stinkhorns.

Darwin's Golfball Fungus - Cyttaria darwinii

Darwin's Golfball Fungus - Cyttaria darwinii

Rhodotus palmatus or the Netted Rhodotus. The only one of it's kind and no relatives.

Rhodotus palmatus or the Netted Rhodotus. The only one of it's kind and no relatives.

Cogumelos - Congumelos coralloides - recebe esse nome porque realmente o fungo se parece com um coral.

Cogumelos - Congumelos coralloides - recebe esse nome porque realmente o fungo se parece com um coral.

https://flic.kr/p/7maFL2 | Phallus multicolor | Veiled stinkhorn fungus.  Taken in Bako National Park.

https://flic.kr/p/7maFL2 | Phallus multicolor | Veiled stinkhorn fungus. Taken in Bako National Park.

Giant Mushrooms - There is a giant mushroom in Oregon that is over 2,400 years old, covers 3.4 square miles of land, and is still growing.

Giant Mushrooms - There is a giant mushroom in Oregon that is over 2,400 years old, covers 3.4 square miles of land, and is still growing.

Marasmius sp.:

46 Magical Wild Mushrooms You Won't Believe Are Real ...

Marasmius sp.:

Spinning-top Fungi (Microporus xanthopus) These large, attractive fungi were photographed on the high bank of the Daintree Rainforest’s Tassel-Fern Creek, decomposing rotten timber brought down from the canopy by Cyclone Olga (Feb. 2010).  The fruiting bodies are supported by a yellow-footed stem and have thin, funnel-shaped caps that are concentrically zoned in various shades of brown.

Spinning-top Fungi (Microporus xanthopus) These large, attractive fungi were photographed on the high bank of the Daintree Rainforest’s Tassel-Fern Creek, decomposing rotten timber brought down from the canopy by Cyclone Olga (Feb. 2010). The fruiting bodies are supported by a yellow-footed stem and have thin, funnel-shaped caps that are concentrically zoned in various shades of brown.

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