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Otafuku.

Otafuku.

Construction of the Mirth Goddess masks.

Construction of the Mirth Goddess masks.

Vintage Japanese Porcelain Hand Painted Noh Mask (Okame Mask?)/Signed

Vintage Japanese Porcelain Hand Painted Noh Mask (Okame Mask?)/Signed

Japanese Mask, Japanese Porcelain, Turning Japanese, Small Stuff, Japanese Design, Nihon, Theater, Tattoo Ideas, Hand Painted

a Jizo

Mossy Jizo statues at Otagi Nenbutsu-ji temple, Kyoto, photo by Tetsuro Hashiguchi.

Today's vibes.

From Parures Africaines; text by Denise Paulme and Jacques Brosse, photographs by M. Huet [et. al], 1956

Antique Japanese Otafuku Carved Ox Bone / by CoCoBlueTreasures

Shop for earrings on Etsy, the place to express your creativity through the buying and selling of handmade and vintage goods.

Fun Fact of the day: The Japanese word for Mumps is Otafuku - because if you have the mumps, your cheeks look like this: Otafuku, mythic cr.

Noh mask, Hannya

We are showing traditional Japanese Noh Masks (Noumen), Devil (Oni) Masks, Kyogen Masks. We have been carving the over 220 historical character masks available for purchase, also we can create and supply any kind of masks you want.

Noh theater - Noh is the oldest dramatic art in Japan, having originally developed in the 14th century.

Noh theater - Noh is the oldest dramatic art in Japan, having originally developed in the century.

Japanese ceramic Okame mask. Okame , also known as Uzume or Otafuku is the name for the female half* of a traditional Japanese Kyogen theatre pair (see below to learn more about Kyogen ). She is considered to be the goddess of mirth and is frequently seen in Japanese art. Her full cheeks and merry eyes are an unforgettable sight and a delight to behold.

Okame , also known as Uzume or Otafuku is the name for the female half* of a traditional Japanese Kyogen theatre pair. She is considered to be the goddess of mirth and is frequently seen in Japanese art

by Ana Montiel

London-based Spanish visual artist and designer Ana Montiel captures having your head in the clouds, the namesake of the En Las Nubes Print. Fifteen percent of the print’s gross sale goes to Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders).

Japanese Ukiyo-e Woodblock print Toyokuni Woman with a

Japanese Ukiyo-e Woodblock print Toyokuni Woman with a

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