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Viking age / Here is original sword from 10-11. century. Arheologians think that it is estonian blacksmith work.

Viking age / Here is original sword from century. Arheologians think that it is estonian blacksmith work.

A resource for historic arms and armor collectors with photo galleries, reviews, reference materials, discussion forums, a bookstore and a comparison tool.

Museum of Cultural History in Oslo. From Vågå church, Oppland, Norway.

Viikinkimiekka II by jarkko1

Type h viking sword. This kind of swords were common in finland, and elsewhere in northern europe, between Blade is pattern welded, i used Viikinkimiekka II

Viking sword hilt, from around the year 1030, at the very end of the Viking Age, Langeid, Bygland (Setesdal, S. Norway). It is a unique sword, embellished with gold, inscriptions and other ornamentation. The sword is 94 cm long; although the iron blade has rusted, the handle is well preserved. It is wrapped with silver thread and the hilt and pommel at the top are covered in silver with details in gold, edged with a copper alloy thread.

In the summer of archaeologists from the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo discovered a Viking burial ground in Langeid in Setesdal in southern Norway. In one of the graves they made the dis.

A Viking sword. York, England - Foter

A Viking Sword found in York, England that was found at a Viking burial site. The Vikings invaded England several times and were known for their brutality. The Vikings influenced some of the behavior and fighting of the Anglo-Saxons.

Viking artifacts from Dublin area. Swords, spearheads, shield bosses, brooches, and gaming pieces. [Watercolor by James Plunkett, ca. 1847]

Viking artifacts from Dublin area. Swords, spearheads, shield bosses, brooches, and gaming pieces.

Thegns of Mercia: Late Anglo-Saxon and "Viking" Swords

The Gilling Sword (C ** From the late Century C. the Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian sword began to change.