Explore 3rd Millennium, Ancient Goddesses, and more!

Female Figurine - Medium: Terracotta Place Made: Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq, Turkey, & Syria) Dates: late 3rd millennium B.C.E. | Brooklyn Museum

Female Figure Medium: Terracotta Place Made: Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq, Turkey, & Syria) Dates: late millennium B.

FEMALE FIGURINE ca. 1630-1539 B.C.E. - Second Intermediate Period - Dynasties 15 to 18 - Terracotta - Egypt

FEMALE FIGURINE ca. Second Intermediate Period Dynasties 15 to 18 Terracotta H: W: D: cm Egypt This type of “doll” figure has been found in ancient Egypt in graves dating.

3000 BC, Goddess of Fertility (Vidra), Romanian Pottery Neolithic | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Gumelnita culture Vidra godess Romania Bulgaria oldest neolithic civilizations eastern europe

Celtic Limestone Female Figure, BC 100 to AD 100. A Celtic goddess, perhaps the Welsh deity Modron or the protectress of horses, Epona. She probably once held fruits symbolic of her fecundity and maternity. The Celts believed in a mother Goddess who presided over mortals, and visualised the gods themselves as belonging to and being controlled by a great divine mother. The Celtic goddesses are embedded in the folk memory and perpetuated in the tales and topographical legends of the country.

A Rare Celtic Early Iron Age Pagan Limestone Sculpture BC to 100 Celtic )

Neolítico. Anatolia. Siria

Neolithic 2500 BC - 1900 BCE Anatolian Bird Women figures with a comparable structure can be found in the Near East from Neolithic times at least up until the Iron Age.

Pottery Mold and Figure [Manabi-Bahia culture of Pre-Columbian Ecuador, 500 BC - 300 AD]

Standing Figure, ceramic from the Esteros or Bahia Culture, Ecuador.

Figurine from Ur III, ca. 2100-2000 BCE, Mesopotamia, Nippur, Neo-Sumerican, ceramic.

Goddess Figurine from Nippur in Mesopotamia Culture, made in ceramiccirca BCE, Neo-Sumerican period - at the British Museum

Hathor Figurine Egypt, 1938-1630 BCE The Brooklyn Museum "Statuettes of naked women with incomplete legs, like this example, have been found in Middle Kingdom tombs and houses. Early Egyptologists mistakenly identified them as concubines intended to provide the spirits of men with an eternity of sexual pleasure. Recent studies show that both men and women used these figures to ensure fertility. In the home, they were believed to enhance a wifes fruitfulness and a husbands ...

Hathor Figurine Egypt, BC The Brooklyn Museum “Statuettes of naked women with incomplete legs, like this example, have been found in Middle Kingdom tombs and houses. Early Egyptologists mistakenly identified them as concubines intended to.

Head of a ruler, ca. 2300–2000 b.c.  Iran or Mesopotamia, Arsenical copper, Met Museum

Head of a ruler Period: Early Bronze Age Date: ca. Geography: Iran or Mesopotamia Medium: Copper alloy Dimensions: 13 Classification: Metalwork

Man and dog Metropolitan Museum  Period:     Neo-Babylonian Date:     ca. 8th–7th century B.C. Geography:     Mesopotamia Culture:     Babylonian Medium:     Bronze

Man and dog Period: Neo-Babylonian Date: ca. Geography: Mesopotamia Culture: Babylonian Medium: Bronze Dimensions: H.

Female Figurine This figurine, one of the oldest statuettes ever excavated in Egypt, perhaps represents a priestess or a goddess dancing or performing ritualized mourning at a funeral ritual. Medium: Terracotta, painted Reportedly From: Ma’mariya, Egypt Dates: ca. 3650 -3300 B.C.E. Period: Predynastic Period, Naqada IIa Period

Female Figurine This figurine, one of the oldest statuettes ever excavated in Egypt, perhaps represents a priestess or a goddess dancing or performing ritualized mourning at a funeral ritual. Medium: Terracotta, painted Reportedly From: Ma’mariya, Egypt D

Female Figurines of bone and ivory Predynastic Naqada I Egypt 4000-3600 BCE

Female Figurines of bone and ivory, Predynastic Naqada I, Egypt BCE, photographed by Mary Harrsch at the British Museum.

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