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Viking Textiles -- A deeper look at plaids, checks, and stripes

Birka Wool - Grave This tabby woven wool has dark red and blue stripes that are wide. Possibly part of a smokkr (aprondress). Thread count is approximately threads per inch

Viking Answer Lady Webpage - Alcoholic Beverages and Drinking Customs of the Viking Age  awesome website with tons of facts

Viking drinking horns from Söderby-Karl, Sweden; drinking horns were reserved for noble man and heroes only

pantry.   Medieval Viking Farmhouse in Þjórsárdalur by tomkokat, via Flickr

pantry. Medieval Viking Farmhouse in Þjórsárdalur by tomkokat, via Flickr

Anna Zariņa. Salaspils Laukskolas kapulauks. 10.-13. gadsimts. 264. lpp. Bruņurupuču saktas.

Anna Zariņa. Salaspils Laukskolas kapulauks. 10.-13. gadsimts. 264. lpp. Bruņurupuču saktas.

A selection of Viking silver from the Cuerdale hoard in the British Museum. Buried in around 905, found in 1840. The Cuerdale Hoard is a hoard of more than 8,600 items, including silver coins, English and Carolingian jewelry, hacksilver and ingots. It was discovered on 15 May 1840 on the southern bank of a bend of the River Ribble, in an area called Cuerdale in South Ribble near to the city of Preston, Lancashire, England.  ~Vidar

midwinter-fire: The Cuerdale hoard, one of the largest Viking silver hoards ever found. midwinter-fire: The Cuerdale hoard, one of the largest Viking silver hoards ever found.

Selection of jewellery found at Hoen, Norway (gold and semi-precious stones), Viking, (9th century) / Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway / Giraudon   Bridgeman Images number KND176637

Vikings: Selection of jewelery found at Hoen, Norway (gold and semi-precious stones), century) / Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway / Giraudon / The Bridgeman Art Library.

Viking blacksmith found buried with his tools

Tongs and a hammer. Archaeologists found more personal items deeper into the grave. (Photo: Howell Roberts, University Museum of Bergen)

Viking toiletries. In many movies and cartoons, the Vikings are shown as dirty, wild-looking, savage men and women, but in reality, the Vikings were quite vain about their appearance. In fact, combs, tweezers, razors and “ear spoons” are among some of the most frequent artifacts from Viking Age excavations. These same excavations have also shown that the Vikings made soap.:

Vikings were quite vain about their appearance. In fact, combs, tweezers, razors and ear spoons are among some of the most frequent artifacts from Viking Age excavations. These same excavations have also shown that the Vikings made soap.

En levande vikingastad | Fotevikens Museum

En levande vikingastad | Fotevikens Museum

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