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Physophora hydrostatica

Physophora hydrostatica

Marrus orthocanna, a deep sea siphonophore. The combined digestive and circulatory system is red; all other parts are transparent.

Marrus orthocanna, a deep sea siphonophore. The combined digestive and circulatory system is red; all other parts are transparent.

Giant Siphonophore front

Giant Siphonophore

Giant Siphonophore front

Physophora hydrostatica

Physophora hydrostatica

Absurd Creature of the Week: The 100-Foot Sea Critter That Deploys a Net of Death | You can't see them here, but this deep-sea siphonophore has glowing red lures that mimic a copepod, drawing in fish that get caught up in the stinging tentacles.   (c) 2007 MBARI  | WIRED.com

Absurd Creature of the Week: The 100-Foot Sea Critter That Deploys a Net of Death

Absurd Creature of the Week: The 100-Foot Sea Critter That Deploys a Net of Death | You can't see them here, but this deep-sea siphonophore has glowing red lures that mimic a copepod, drawing in fish that get caught up in the stinging tentacles. (c) 2007 MBARI | WIRED.com

Johnsen Lab - Pelagic animals

Johnsen Lab - Pelagic animals

BooTtyFuLl

BooTtyFuLl

The siphonophores are free-swimming or floating colonies. Unlike species of the two other major orders of Hydrozoans, the medusae are never released from the stem. The colony is often held together by a long thread where different kinds of specialized animals are attached. Some digest food, while others use stinging tentacles to catch their prey. They hand the food over to the "stomachs" that swallow and digest the food, and thus provide nutrition for the entire colony. Some even emit light.

The siphonophores are free-swimming or floating colonies. Unlike species of the two other major orders of Hydrozoans, the medusae are never released from the stem. The colony is often held together by a long thread where different kinds of specialized animals are attached. Some digest food, while others use stinging tentacles to catch their prey. They hand the food over to the "stomachs" that swallow and digest the food, and thus provide nutrition for the entire colony. Some even emit light.

glass sponge | Tumblr

glass sponge | Tumblr

This "colonial" jelly—a siphonophore of the Rosacea genus—was spied in April 2006 by divers in the blue waters of the Sargasso Sea during a Census of Marine Zooplankton cruise. Siphonophores are made up of multiple units, each specialized for a function like swimming, feeding, or reproduction. This "modular" construction allows some siphonophores to grow very large, over 100 feet in the deep ocean. (Photo by Laurence Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Rosacea

This "colonial" jelly—a siphonophore of the Rosacea genus—was spied in April 2006 by divers in the blue waters of the Sargasso Sea during a Census of Marine Zooplankton cruise. Siphonophores are made up of multiple units, each specialized for a function like swimming, feeding, or reproduction. This "modular" construction allows some siphonophores to grow very large, over 100 feet in the deep ocean. (Photo by Laurence Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Rosacea

Physophora hydrostatica

Physophora hydrostatica

siphonophore

siphonophore

Hula Skirt Siphonophore - Physophora hydrostatica - Known to be widespread in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, this siphonophore is of the family Physophoridae

Hula Skirt Siphonophore - Physophora hydrostatica - Known to be widespread in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, this siphonophore is of the family Physophoridae

A colony of 12 salps drifts through the distant tropical waters of the Phoenix Islands. The salps are transparent tubular animals arranged around a center, like segments in an orange. For food, they filter tiny particles out of the water, and the orange loops are their stomachs. Each salp, both mom and pop, carries a baby (see the small tube attached to two circles, upper left) and a testis (the bright white areas near the stomachs.)

A colony of 12 salps drifts through the distant tropical waters of the Phoenix Islands. The salps are transparent tubular animals arranged around a center, like segments in an orange. For food, they filter tiny particles out of the water, and the orange loops are their stomachs. Each salp, both mom and pop, carries a baby (see the small tube attached to two circles, upper left) and a testis (the bright white areas near the stomachs.)

Jellyyyyyyyyyy!!

Jellyyyyyyyyyy!!

Helioceras heteromorph ammonite

Helioceras heteromorph ammonite