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Cave art

Cave art

A troll is a supernatural being in Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore. In origin, troll may have been a negative synonym for a jötunn (plural jötnar), a being in Norse mythology. In Old Norse sources, beings described as trolls dwell in isolated rocks, mountains, or caves, live together in small family units, and are rarely helpful to human beings.

Finding spirited presences in trees has long been part of woodland myth and folkore world wide. Here are other "tree people" images by some of my favorite mythic artists: Illustrations by Arthur Rackham From "The Land of Froud" by Brian.

Suomenusko, 'the Finnish Faith', ancient nature religion | Wikipedia Finnish Paganism

Suomenusko, 'the Finnish Faith', ancient nature religion

Gunnlöð, or more simply Gunnlod, was a Norse goddess, and a giant, like her father Suttungr, who asked her to guard the mythical “Mead of poetry,” which he’d hidden in a cave. Odin, who wanted the mead for its magical properties — hey, who wouldn’t? — snuck in and seduced Gunnlöð. He either (tales vary) “bargained three nights of sex for three sips of the mead and then tricked her, stealing all of it” or “Gunnlöð helped Odin willingly,” as told in the Norse poem Hávamál.

Gunnlod Artist: Anders Zorn (Viking princess would be my name for this)

Rock art - Pictograph - Native American rock painting close to Douglas, Wyoming, USA. One possible interpretation of this painting is: On the left side a group of United States Army soldiers with different insignia and on the right side Native Americans are shown.

Native American rock painting close to Douglas, Wyoming, USA. One possible interpretation of this painting is: On the left side a group of United States Army soldiers with different insignia and on the right side Native Americans are shown

Brunhilde slowly and silently leads her horse down the path to the cave.    Arthur Rackham

Brunnhilde silently leads horse down path to cave, from 'The Rhinegold and the Valkyrie' by Arthur Rackham

In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep. His twin was Thánatos ("death"); their mother was the goddess Nyx  ("night") and father Erebos  ("darkness").

In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep. His twin was Thánatos ("death"); their mother was the goddess Nyx ("night") and father Erebos ("darkness").

Loki and Sigyn  Mårten Eskil Winge  1863

Classic Illustrations from Norse Mythology Loki god of fire & magic bound and his famously loyal wife Sigyn. Who stayed with him and caught the poison that fell from the snake, meant to punish Loki.

Brunnhilde with her horse ...from Rhinegold and Valkyries series by Arthur Rackham from an opera die Walkure by Richard Wagner

Arthur Rackham:Brunnhilde with her horse at the mouth of the cave, illustration from The Rhinegold and the Valkyrie, 1910

Sigyn, Deity of the North. When Loki was bound in the cave as punishment for Baldur’s Death, his wife Sigyn stood besides him, holding a bowl above his head to catch the venom of a snake the Goddess Skhadi had secured over his face. Whenever she had to empty the bowl, the poison would drip over Loki’s body, causing him to writhe so violently that the planet shakes.  Loki is sometimes refered as “The burden of Sigyn"...

In Norse mythology, Sigyn (Old Norse "victorious girl-friend") is a goddess and is the wife of Loki.

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