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AN ANATOLIAN SCHEMATIC MARBLE IDOL KUSURA-BEYCESULTAN VARIETY, EARLY BRONZE AGE II, CIRCA 2700-2300 B.C. The thin flat figure with a disk-shaped head on a long slightly-flaring neck, the notched side lock projecting on the right side of the head with oblique striations, the triangular arms offset from the circular body 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) high

AN ANATOLIAN SCHEMATIC MARBLE IDOL KUSURA-BEYCESULTAN VARIETY, EARLY BRONZE AGE II, CIRCA 2700-2300 B.C. The thin flat figure with a disk-shaped head on a long slightly-flaring neck, the notched side lock projecting on the right side of the head with oblique striations, the triangular arms offset from the circular body 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) high

This highly stylised figurine is a variant of a class of idol found predominantly in the Cyclades, but also elsewhere in the Ancient Near East. This variant has been called the 'Kusura type' by Colin Renfrew (1969: 27ff.) after the site where a number of examples were discovered. The distribution of this particular type indicates a Western Anatolian origin, for similar idols have been found at Burdur, Samos, Lebedos, Troy, near Manisa and at Karatas-Semayuk .

Early Bronze Age II (c. Acquired Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Collection.

シリア目の土偶②ふたりのタイプ https://twitter.com/momokanazawa/status/571843042165985280

Momo Kanazawa on

A Syrian marble double eye idol / Tell Brak / c. millennium BCE / The thin plaque with four eyes with continuous single brow above, the body decorated with three zigzag lines in.

Ancient Greece - 6000-5000 B.C. Steatopygous Idol (George Ortiz,  Collection, terracotta) by RasMarley, via Flickr

mini-girlz: “ Steatopygous Idol Terracotta H: cm From Thessaly (between Volos and Lamia) - found in a well Early Neolithic millennium B.

La Gran Diosa honra los misterios del cuerpo femenino reflejados en su útero y en la luna creciente y menguante que nos enseñan que la existencia no se desarrolla en una línea recta, ni siquiera en un círculo, sino en una espiral de crecimiento eterno.

Carved Female (“Venus”) figure holding horn with markings, from Laussel, France, ca. It's been suggested that the 13 notches on the ‘horn’ she is holding represent the number of moons/ menstrual cycles in a year.

Anatolian marble kusura idol  Early 3rd millenium BC

Anatolian marble kusura idol Early 3rd millenium BC

A GREY STONE EYE IDOL   syria or mesopotamia, circa 3500-3000 b.c.   With a pair of large "eyes" formed as two connecting open cylinders atop the rectangular neck and flaring bell-shaped body

A GREY STONE EYE IDOL syria or mesopotamia, circa b. With a pair of large "eyes" formed as two connecting open cylinders atop the rectangular neck and flaring bell-shaped body

AN ANATOLIAN MARBLE FEMALE IDOL EARLY CHALCOLITHIC PERIOD, CIRCA MID-6TH MILLENNIUM B.C. 18,2 cm H

AN ANATOLIAN MARBLE FEMALE IDOL EARLY CHALCOLITHIC PERIOD, CIRCA MID-6TH MILLENNIUM B.C. 18,2 cm H

Female figurine with jewelry and costume from Ludus, Serbia, Dubovac Culture, 15th century BCE, terracotta

source : female idol with jewelry and costume from ludus, serbia, dubovac culture terracotta height 20 cm _ collection art statuette figurine antique poterie ciselée serbe

Iran,Elamite bronze idol, ca 2500-1900 BC (horn was a symbol of divinity in ancient elam) . تندیس کوچک یک مرد عیلامی با شاخ، ۲۵۰۰-۱۹۰۰ بک ( شاخ یکی‌ از نمادهای الوهیت نزد ایلامیان بوده است)  / موزه مجازى هنر ايران در فيسبوک

Levantine Bronze Idol - Date: 2500 BC - 1900 BC Culture: Mesopotamian, Persian

Amulets, Ancient Art, Idol, Old Art

Sitting Venus (Magna Mater) of Hrádok, 1st half of the 4th millenium BC. Late Neolithic, Lengyel culture provenance: Šurany - Nitriansky Hrádok, West Slovakia

Sitting Venus (Magna Mater) of Hrádok, half of the millenium BC, detail 2 Late Neolithic, Lengyel culture height: 27 cm provenance: Šurany - Nitriansky Hrádok, West Slovakia

Neolítico. Anatolia. Siria

Neolithic 2500 BC - 1900 BCE Anatolian Bird Women figures with a comparable structure can be found in the Near East from Neolithic times at least up until the Iron Age.

Lime plaster, early 7th millennium B.C.E., From Southern Anatolia  From the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. On loan from the private collection of Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen.

Lime plaster, early 7th millennium B.C.E., From Southern Anatolia From the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. On loan from the private collection of Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen.

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