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Majestuoso!

Vulture, called the Great Purifier in ancient traditions can be called upon for spiritual purification.

Cape Griffon or Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres), also known as Kolbe's Vulture.

Vautour du Cap // Cape Griffon (Aka Cape Vulture , Kolbe's Vulture) - It nests on cliffs and lays one egg per year.

American ninja warrior

Jean-Claude Van Damme splits done first by Marsh wren by Roger Eriksson, via Audubon Magazine

Palm-nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis), also known as the Vulturine Fish Eagle, this bird of prey is unusual in that about 60 percent of its diet is nuts from the oil palm. Found in Sub-sharan Africa it ranges from Gambia across to Kenya and s far south as NE South Africa. This captive example was photographed by Martin Uiterweeerd at Zoo Parc Overloon, The Netherlands on 1st November 2014

Palm-nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis), also known as the Vulturine Fish Eagle, this bird of prey is unusual in that about 60 percent of its diet is nuts from the oil palm. Found in Sub-sharan Africa it ranges from Gambia across to Kenya and s far south

* Abutre-Grifo-de-Rüpell * aka "Grifo-de-Rüpell", "Abutre-de-Rüpell", "Grifo-Pedrês". (Gyps rueppelli).

Rüppell's Vulture or Rüppell's Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppellii) is a large vulture that occurs throughout the Sahel region of central Africa.

White-headed Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis) is an Old World vulture endemic to Africa.

White-headed Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis) is an Old World vulture endemic to Africa. Poor baby looks like he lost his hat

White-rumped vultures   (Gyps bengalensis) were once a familiar sight in the cities of southern Asia, with a population numbering millions, but its numbers plummeted fast in the 1990s. It was discovered that an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat injured cattle was to blame. When the cattle died, the vultures would ingest the drug and suffer a slow, painful death

In pictures: Atlas of Rare Birds by Dominic Couzens

White-rumped vultures (Gyps bengalensis) were once a familiar sight in the cities of southern Asia, with a population numbering millions, but its numbers plummeted fast in the 1990s. It was discovered that an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat injured cattle was to blame. When the cattle died, the vultures would ingest the drug and suffer a slow, painful death

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