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White kitchen with vintage rug.

White kitchen with vintage rug.

Detail of a relief finnish ceramic artist  Rut Bryk

Detail of a relief finnish ceramic artist Rut Bryk

Orden en el baño!

Orden en el baño!

I like this floor for the bathroom

I like this floor for the bathroom

A flock of birds or are they bats? flying in the light of the moon!

A flock of birds or are they bats? flying in the light of the moon!

Ma Vie Secrète : Photo

Ma Vie Secrète : Photo

This looks like the underground dwelling of the Tuatha de Danaan, or "Children of Danu", the mythological mother goddess of the Irish Celts. Creatures such as leprechauns and other Fairy Folk were known to inhabit these places, particularly under the burial mounds, which were also known as the fairy mounds for that reason.

This looks like the underground dwelling of the Tuatha de Danaan, or "Children of Danu", the mythological mother goddess of the Irish Celts. Creatures such as leprechauns and other Fairy Folk were known to inhabit these places, particularly under the burial mounds, which were also known as the fairy mounds for that reason.

#interiordesign - phillip lloyd powell – a forgotten member of the american studio movement ~ the modern sybarite

#interiordesign - phillip lloyd powell – a forgotten member of the american studio movement ~ the modern sybarite

glass and concrete sculptures by Ben Young

glass and concrete sculptures by Ben Young

Dwell - Have You Ever Wanted to Stay in a Norwegian Sea Cabin? This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins that jut out from their natural ledge. Architect Snorre Stinessen carefully positioned them on an existing stone quay and built them to fit two to four travelers, or a family of five. To allow them to cantilever off the edge, their cross laminated timber floor plates are mounted onto two steel beams.

Dwell - Have You Ever Wanted to Stay in a Norwegian Sea Cabin? This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins that jut out from their natural ledge. Architect Snorre Stinessen carefully positioned them on an existing stone quay and built them to fit two to four travelers, or a family of five. To allow them to cantilever off the edge, their cross laminated timber floor plates are mounted onto two steel beams.