timramone

timramone

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Norse God Forseti (Old Norse “the presiding one,” actually “president” in Modern Icelandic and Faroese) is an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology.

Norse God Forseti (Old Norse “the presiding one,” actually “president” in Modern Icelandic and Faroese) is an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology. Opposite to his fellow god, Tyr.

Brooches of the Viking era Urnes Style

Viking brooches: Inspired by nature but not enslaved to 'realism', this subtle style emphasizes the grace and beauty of that which, at bottom, we do not truly understand - but might attain to if we only trust our instincts.

This is a set of tools which belonged to an Iron Age Viking craftsman. They apparently went overboard and were lost while he was trying to cross lake Mästermyr on the island of Gotland. In 1936 the wooden chest containing all the tools was found at the bottom of the former lake, which had turned into a bog over the centuries. This man had quite a collection of axes, hammers, tongs, punches, plate shears, saw blades, files, rasps, drills, chisels, knives, awls and whetstones among the 200…

1000 years ago some Viking lost in the lake his chest with axes, sawdrills, chisels, knives, awls and 200 other objects. In 1936 on an island off the coast of Sweden a farmer plowing a recently drained swampland was stopped.

Viking Age swords. They're so old and cool

Seven Viking Age swords on display in Bergen Museum (numbered 5 to 11 in the display case). The long sword in the middle is a Petersen type C sword found in Sæbø, Hoprekstad, Vik i Sogn municipality, Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway.

HDR of a stone ship on Gotland, Sweden. The so called "Tjelvar's grave" was erected around 750 BC during the Nordic Bronze Age. According to a myth described in the Gutasaga, it is the grave of Tjelvar, the first person on Gotland. Before he came to Gotland, the island disappeared in daytime and was only visible above the surface at night. Tjelvar brought fire to the island and caused Gotland to stay above the surface...

Tjelvar’s Grave on Gotland Island, Sweden: A stone ship was an early burial custom in Scandanavia. Most are dated 1000 - 500 BC. This particular grave is dated at 750 BC. According to legend Tjelvar was the mythical discoverer of Gotland.