Eevi
Muita ideoita: Eevi
Norse mythology.

Norse mythology.

In Norse mythology, Fenrir  or Vánagandr  is a monstrous wolf.   In both the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, Fenrir is the father of the wolves Sköll and Hati Hróðvitnisson, is a son of Loki, and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök, but will in turn be killed by Odin's son Víðarr.

In Norse mythology, Fenrir or Vánagandr is a monstrous wolf. In both the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, Fenrir is the father of the wolves Sköll and Hati Hróðvitnisson, is a son of Loki, and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök, but will in turn be killed by Odin's son Víðarr.

Tyr offering Fenrir his wrist.

Tyr offering Fenrir his wrist.

Norse runes.

Norse runes.

Traditional bindrunes.

Traditional bindrunes.

Waldorf ~ 4th grade ~ Norse Mythology ~ Yggdrasil ~ main lesson book

Waldorf ~ 4th grade ~ Norse Mythology ~ Yggdrasil ~ main lesson book

Yggdrasil, the tree that holds up the twelve realms of Nordic mythology.

Yggdrasil, the tree that holds up the twelve realms of Nordic mythology.

In Norse mythology, Huginn (from Old Norse "thought") and Muninn (Old Norse "memory" or "mind") are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring information to the god Odin.

In Norse mythology, Huginn (from Old Norse "thought") and Muninn (Old Norse "memory" or "mind") are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring information to the god Odin.

Nidhogg chewing at the roots of Yggrdasil

Nidhogg chewing at the roots of Yggrdasil

In Norse mythology, Jörmungandr, or "Midgarðsormr" was a sea serpent so long that it encircled the entire world, Midgard. Some stories report of sailors mistaking its back for a chain of islands. Sea serpents also appear frequently in later Scandinavian folklore, particularly in that of Norway.

In Norse mythology, Jörmungandr, or "Midgarðsormr" was a sea serpent so long that it encircled the entire world, Midgard. Some stories report of sailors mistaking its back for a chain of islands. Sea serpents also appear frequently in later Scandinavian folklore, particularly in that of Norway.