Veera Alanko

Veera Alanko

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Veera Alanko
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Vashon Island, WA: Pathway leads through the Stumpery Garden featuring a variety of ferns, hostas and woodland plants.

Vashon Island, WA Flowering viburnum, columbine, and hostas edge a garden bed under a dogwood tree with rhododendrons blooming along the forest edge

In London's Stoke Common Nature Reserve, a gatehouse built in the early 1990s sits on three bucolic acres, surrounded by woodlands of ferns, pines, and rho

In London's Stoke Common Nature Reserve, a gatehouse built in the early 1990s sits on three bucolic acres, surrounded by woodlands of ferns, pines, and rho

In 1582, Toyotomi Hideyoshi buried his predecessor, Oda Nobunaga, at Daitoku-ji. He also contributed land and built the Sōken-in. Around this period in history, Daitoku-ji became closely linked to the master of the Japanese tea ceremony, Sen no Rikyū, and consequently to the realm of the Japanese tea ceremony. After the era of Sen no Rikyū, another famous figure in the history of the Japanese tea ceremony who left his mark at this temple was Kobori Enshū.

In 1582, Toyotomi Hideyoshi buried his predecessor, Oda Nobunaga, at Daitoku-ji. He also contributed land and built the Sōken-in. Around this period in history, Daitoku-ji became closely linked to the master of the Japanese tea ceremony, Sen no Rikyū, and consequently to the realm of the Japanese tea ceremony. After the era of Sen no Rikyū, another famous figure in the history of the Japanese tea ceremony who left his mark at this temple was Kobori Enshū.

In 1582, Toyotomi Hideyoshi buried his predecessor, Oda Nobunaga, at Daitoku-ji. He also contributed land and built the Sōken-in. Around this period in history, Daitoku-ji became closely linked to the master of the Japanese tea ceremony, Sen no Rikyū, and consequently to the realm of the Japanese tea ceremony. After the era of Sen no Rikyū, another famous figure in the history of the Japanese tea ceremony who left his mark at this temple was Kobori Enshū.

In 1582, Toyotomi Hideyoshi buried his predecessor, Oda Nobunaga, at Daitoku-ji. He also contributed land and built the Sōken-in. Around this period in history, Daitoku-ji became closely linked to the master of the Japanese tea ceremony, Sen no Rikyū, and consequently to the realm of the Japanese tea ceremony. After the era of Sen no Rikyū, another famous figure in the history of the Japanese tea ceremony who left his mark at this temple was Kobori Enshū.

Bloedel Reserve Japanese Garden

The Japanese Garden in Seattle is ranked as one of the best in the US. Designed by Juki Iida in it is a compact stroll garden (no karesansui) around a beautiful pond.

#庭 #石 #重森三玲

#庭 #石 #重森三玲